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Finding help

If you have concerns your child might be affected by anything you’ve read here, you may want to raise the issue with someone you trust, perhaps a friend or family member who knows your child well. Explain your worries, and find out if they have noticed anything out of the ordinary.

Two heads are better than one, and hearing another perspective may help you decide if something is seriously wrong, and suggestions on the likely cause.

If, following this, you believe your child is at risk, the first thing to do is to talk to them. It’s important to remember not to be confrontational. This is a sensitive subject and needs handling carefully as you don’t want to push them away or shut them out.

They need to be able to speak to you openly. So be calm, don’t get angry and they’re far more likely to open up to you. Encourage them to share their ideas and opinions.

Many young people who act on their support for terrorist groups by planning an attack are often not aware of the realities and consequences of what they are about to do, or the arguments against it. Any young person who plans an attack, even if they have no intention of carrying it through, could face imprisonment.

Resources

Childnet →

Childnet International is a non-profit organisation that works with others to make the internet a safe place for children.

Parentzone →

Helps families deal with the many difficulties thrown up by the pace of technological change, and helps parents keep children safe online.

NSPCC →

The NSPCC is the leading children’s charity in the UK, specialising in child protection and dedicated to the fight for every childhood.

UKSIC →

The UK Safer Internet Centre is coordinated by a partnership of three leading organisations.

Keeping Children Safe →

Published advice that gives parents information on keeping children and young people safe against radicalisation and extremism.

Thinkuknow →

A guide to internet safety, and safe surfing for young people.

Dosespot →

A Parent's Guide to Children's Computer Safety